Professional Skills Videos

We are pleased to present members with a suite of new CPD materials, designed to assist you in meeting your professional training obligations.

These ten videos have been carefully selected from the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries (UK) to facilitate Professionalism Training as envisaged by PS1 and include an additional ten 'follow up' videos that feature commentary on the case studies presented in each video.

You can access these videos via the below links, the CPD Hub and the CPD Dashboard. You can also log these videos and other CPD items in the CPD Dashboard to track your progress. 

If you have any questions, please contact the CPD team via cpd@actuaries.asn.au.

All in a days work
Pui Yee, a recent recruit at ILAC, lets slip she is about to use proprietary software from her previous company to help with a particular task. Andrew, Chief Actuary, then puts her professional judgement to the test by devising a number of scenarios for her to resolve.
 
 
  
Follow Up - All in a days work
Pui Yee, a recent recruit at ILAC, lets slip she is about to use proprietary software from her previous company to help with a particular task. Andrew, Chief Actuary, then puts her professional judgement to the test by devising a number of scenarios for her to resolve.
  
 
  
Between a rock and a hard place
It has always been a requirement of the Code of Conduct to speak up if there is something wrong – the new Code has made this more central by making it an explicit requirement. This is told through our Actuary Yohan with the pros of speaking up being voiced by his partner Angela and the cons by his work colleague Des.
  
 
  
Follow Up - Between a rock and a hard place
It has always been a requirement of the Code of Conduct to speak up if there is something wrong – the new Code has made this more central by making it an explicit requirement. This is told through our Actuary Yohan with the pros of speaking up being voiced by his partner Angela and the cons by his work colleague Des.
  
 
   
Contribution Conundrum
Frank, has taken over the pension scheme of a family run business following the retirement of the longstanding Scheme Actuary.  He is meeting his new clients Prakesh and Dipa, for the first time. As the discussion progresses, Frank begins to imagine potential alternative outcomes depending on the advice he gives, neither of which end well for Frank.
  
 
   
Follow Up - Contribution Conundrum
Frank, has taken over the pension scheme of a family run business following the retirement of the longstanding Scheme Actuary.  He is meeting his new clients Prakesh and Dipa, for the first time. As the discussion progresses, Frank begins to imagine potential alternative outcomes depending on the advice he gives, neither of which end well for Frank.
  
 
   
Do IT right
An insurer has licensed a platform and set of models from an actuarial software provider, with an annual licence fee. The insurer decides to build their own bespoke modelling system, and populate it using the calculation methodology from the software provider’s models. They intend to then break from the software provider and cease paying a licence fee. How should an actuary working for the insurer react to this? 
  
 
  
Follow Up - Do IT right
An insurer has licensed a platform and set of models from an actuarial software provider, with an annual licence fee. The insurer decides to build their own bespoke modelling system, and populate it using the calculation methodology from the software provider’s models. They intend to then break from the software provider and cease paying a licence fee. How should an actuary working for the insurer react to this? 
  
 
  
Head to Head
Peter, has presented a range of results for the IBNR reserves, explaining risks and uncertainties with a mid-point of £170m. At the next meeting of the Board, he initially suggests a range of £120 to £205m but when challenged further he suggests an 80% range of £160 to £180m.  Financial Director, Stephanie, is not happy and some of the board members challenge Peter and it’s clear there’s a push to move to the bottom of the range.
  
 
   
Follow Up - Head to Head
Peter, has presented a range of results for the IBNR reserves, explaining risks and uncertainties with a mid-point of £170m. At the next meeting of the Board, he initially suggests a range of £120 to £205m but when challenged further he suggests an 80% range of £160 to £180m.  Financial Director, Stephanie, is not happy and some of the board members challenge Peter and it’s clear there’s a push to move to the bottom of the range.
  
 
   
Shortcut to success
What happens when teams are forced to make a lot of decisions and come up with a ‘best estimate’ in a hurry, which is clearly outside their comfort zone. Management are clearly driving for an answer they ‘want to hear’ on order to win some business.
  
 
   
Slippery slope
This video is set in a risk management context and Susan, a Risk Actuary, is faced with a dilemma when asked to give the go-ahead of a new product in the absence of the Chief Risk Officer and under pressure from the Financial Director.
  
 
   
To sell or not to sell
TJ is an actuary working for a pensions consultancy, known for his fast and accurate work. TJ finds the relentless pressure to sell to clients a bit distasteful, however, he finds himself under ever increasing pressure from his boss to sell the latest asset-liability modelling suite of programmes to a client he is due to meet next week – whether the client needs it or not!
  
 
   
A level playing field
This video deals with conflicts of interest. The Chief Actuary is ‘pushing’ his friend’s product – or is that just Martine’s ‘perception’ of the situation? She ‘thinks’ but she doesn’t ‘know’. It could be a good product but she is being put under intense pressure to ‘get it sorted’, plus she has so many other things to sort out on her other projects.
  
   
Follow Up - Does this add up? - Overview
Sara has been providing advice to pension scheme clients who want to make medium to long-term plans to bring their scheme into a funding position. The team have been developing a new model which is relatively untested. Her client is keen to use the software but doesn’t want to pay for testing or controls.
 
Follow Up - Shortcut to success
What happens when teams are forced to make a lot of decisions and come up with a ‘best estimate’ in a hurry, which is clearly outside their comfort zone. Management are clearly driving for an answer they ‘want to hear’ on order to win some business.
  
 
    
Follow Up - Slippery slope
Susan, a Risk Actuary, is faced with a dilemma when asked to give the go-ahead of a new product in the absence of the Chief Risk Officer and under pressure from the Financial Director.
  
 
   
 
Narrator - To sell or not to sell
TJ is an actuary working for a pensions consultancy, known for his fast and accurate work. TJ finds the relentless pressure to sell to clients a bit distasteful, however, he finds himself under ever increasing pressure from his boss to sell the latest asset-liability modelling suite of programmes to a client he is due to meet next week – whether the client needs it or not!
  
 
   
Does this add up
Sara has been providing advice to pension scheme clients who want to make medium to long-term plans to bring their scheme into a funding position. The team have been developing a new model which is relatively untested. Her client is keen to use the software but doesn’t want to pay for testing or controls.
  
 
Follow Up - Does this add up? - TAS and Code Overview
Sara has been providing advice to pension scheme clients who want to make medium to long-term plans to bring their scheme into a funding position. The team have been developing a new model which is relatively untested. Her client is keen to use the software but doesn’t want to pay for testing or controls.